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The Slow Cancellation of the Future
 

offline Tony Danza from not today, satan on 2019-08-25 20:53 [#02584109]
Points: 1592 Status: Regular



"Rather than the old recoiling from the ‘new’ in fear
and incomprehension, those whose expectations were formed in
an earlier era are more likely to be startled by the sheer
persistence of recognisable forms. Nowhere is this clearer
than in popular music culture. It was through the mutations
of popular music that many of those of us who grew up in the
1960s, 70s and 80s learned to measure the passage of
cultural time. But faced with 21st Century music, it is the
very sense of future shock which has disappeared. This is
quickly established by performing a simple thought
experiment. Imagine any record released in the past couple
of years being beamed back in time to, say, 1995 and played
on the radio. It’s hard to think that it will produce any
jolt in the listeners. On the contrary, what would be likely
to shock our 1995 audience would be the very recognisability
of the sounds: would music really have changed so little in
the next seventeen years? Contrast this with the rapid
turnover of styles between the 1960s and the 90s: play a
jungle record from 1993 to someone in 1989 and it would have
sounded like something so new that it challenged them to
rethink what music was, or could be. While 20th Century
experimental culture was seized by a recombinatorial
delirium, which made it feel as if newness was infinitely
available, the 21st Century is oppressed by a crushing sense
of finitude and exhaustion. It doesn’t feel like the
future. Or, alternatively, it doesn’t feel as if the 21st
Century has started yet."

Mark Fisher on why everything's the same forever, now


 

online Hyperflake from Wirral (United Kingdom) on 2019-08-25 21:07 [#02584110]
Points: 24605 Status: Addict | Followup to Tony Danza: #02584109



Im sure there have been stagnation like periods in previous
centuries, I think its cos the 20th century was such a
radical change to human culture everything else seems
pedestrian, its true though I haven't noticed much cultural
difference in the past 15 years apart from the internet
thought police


 

online Hyperflake from Wirral (United Kingdom) on 2019-08-25 21:10 [#02584111]
Points: 24605 Status: Addict



LAZY_TITLE

this is a good illustration of the massive explosion of
creativity in the 80s and 90s and now seems just to be minor
variations on a theme


 

offline Tony Danza from not today, satan on 2019-08-25 21:21 [#02584112]
Points: 1592 Status: Regular | Followup to Hyperflake: #02584110



> its true though I haven't noticed much cultural difference
in the past 15 years apart from the internet thought police

Hm yes, Fisher wrote about that too


 

online belb from mmmmmmhhhhzzzz!!! on 2019-08-25 21:31 [#02584115]
Points: 4274 Status: Lurker



bookmarked for later reading, but i'll wade in prematurely
anyway:

it's all about the low end. better, smaller speakers and
headphones than in 1995 - you don't have to go out clubbing
to feel that bass weight, even in pop music. producers are
aware of bass in a way that they didn't used to be, and a
pop record now is influenced by dubstep and trap in sound
palette and eq as well as rhythm.

halfstep beat patterns from dubstep have been the main
rhythmic shift, it's everywhere now but was alien to the
90s. listening to guitar music from then reveals it to be
pretty fucking tinny, and glitch stuff from around that time
is very polite in bass terms too. neither has halfstep or
anythung like todays 808-clones and weighty soundsystem
influence.

granted, jungle had thundering sub too but it never
infiltrated popular music in the same way. i'm convinced a
combination of software availability, better speaker quality
and dubstep / trap have influenced popular music like
nothing else.

happy to hear rebuttals tho!


 

online Hyperflake from Wirral (United Kingdom) on 2019-08-25 21:32 [#02584116]
Points: 24605 Status: Addict | Followup to Tony Danza: #02584112



yeah there is this culture of totally witch hunting someone
if they say the slightest thing that might be perceived
offensive that is really fucked up, its really bad
harassment some of it


 

offline EpicMegatrax from Greatest Hits on 2019-08-25 22:37 [#02584119]
Points: 12554 Status: Addict



another topic i've been stewing on -- how much is there left
to do in music?

i remember i was home from high school on christmas break
and i got the newly-released drukqs from amazon on CD, and i
was positively freaking out over it. super, wicked excited.

i naively assumed that was going to be something that kept
happening.

i fear we've reached a point where innovation in music has
effectively saturated the mammal brain. it's not too bad;
music has endless stylistic variations that will allow for
fresh creation forever more. however, in terms of sheer
technical depth, it's kind of hard to make something that is
simultaneously more complex than what came before, yet still
accessible. you can make increasingly technical magic-ear
kinda music like autechre, or classical music so technical
no one gets it, but since no one gets it, it doesn't go very
far beyond people who have spent years building up the
mental architecture to perceive what's actually good about
the music.

there is probably still a bit to be done, but we're already
beyond the chord/melody aspects of music and into
psychoacoustics, deft use of sociological touchstones,
whatever

on the front of ~pop~ music, dubstep came and went. dubstep
: genre :: orch hit : sample. and now it's burned itself
out. it was a cheap trick that grabbed people, then they got
used to it, now it's just part of the larger library of
sounds


 

offline EpicMegatrax from Greatest Hits on 2019-08-25 22:37 [#02584120]
Points: 12554 Status: Addict | Followup to belb: #02584115



i need some better sub machinery for writing jungle


 

offline EpicMegatrax from Greatest Hits on 2019-08-25 22:42 [#02584121]
Points: 12554 Status: Addict



guess i need to raise $4k


 

offline wavephace from President, CJAX on 2019-08-26 03:34 [#02584129]
Points: 2899 Status: Regular | Followup to Tony Danza: #02584109



No offense but this is fucking bullshit. I mean take Lizzo
for instance. There's no way a gorgeous, unapologetically
plus-size black woman twerking in a bodysuit while playing
the flute would be nominated for an MTV Video Music Award in
1995.


 

offline wavephace from President, CJAX on 2019-08-26 03:37 [#02584130]
Points: 2899 Status: Regular



White males who can't tell the difference between now and
1995 have no business doing cultural commentary at all.


 

offline wavephace from President, CJAX on 2019-08-26 03:43 [#02584131]
Points: 2899 Status: Regular



Seriously if you think this consider donating your account
to CJAX and registering on the Steve Hoffman forum instead.


 

offline EpicMegatrax from Greatest Hits on 2019-08-26 04:08 [#02584132]
Points: 12554 Status: Addict



who the fuck is lizzo


 

offline EpicMegatrax from Greatest Hits on 2019-08-26 04:22 [#02584133]
Points: 12554 Status: Addict



here's a conspiracy for you

LAZY_TITLE
LAZY_TITLE

don't these logos look similar?
a little too similar?

you might have to tell mom to get someone else next time she
goes to the store


 

offline EpicMegatrax from Greatest Hits on 2019-08-26 04:50 [#02584135]
Points: 12554 Status: Addict



i see you, car


 

offline chachmaster3000 on 2019-08-26 08:47 [#02584143]
Points: 648 Status: Regular



https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultural_memory


 

offline wavephace from President, CJAX on 2019-08-27 01:32 [#02584200]
Points: 2899 Status: Regular | Followup to EpicMegatrax: #02584132



Now I know you're a bot.


 

offline EpicMegatrax from Greatest Hits on 2019-08-29 05:36 [#02584344]
Points: 12554 Status: Addict



we're all bots
just made of meat
not software


 

online Hyperflake from Wirral (United Kingdom) on 2019-08-29 19:34 [#02584385]
Points: 24605 Status: Addict



we live in the cunt epoch


 

offline ijonspeches from 109P/Swift-Tuttle on 2019-08-29 22:33 [#02584404]
Points: 5237 Status: Regular | Show recordbag



dont care too much about lack of change in music,
but where´s my jetpack and robotic pet-pal?! (combined if
necessary)


 

offline steve mcqueen from caerdydd (United Kingdom) on 2019-08-29 23:23 [#02584419]
Points: 4115 Status: Addict



It's like that joke about the piano player who only plays
the same note over and over again, - other people are
looking for it, he's found it.
Don't listen to journos, 99% of them are only in it for
the £££ and wouldn't know a good tune unless their
fucking 'warm arts' London dinner party peer group tells
them about it.


 

offline steve mcqueen from caerdydd (United Kingdom) on 2019-08-29 23:28 [#02584421]
Points: 4115 Status: Addict



BTW the important part in the last sentense is peer group...
I bet u could run network simulations of this where the
nodes are less succeptible to outside influnces, won't be as
chaotic, as fast changing, interesting.


 

offline steve mcqueen from caerdydd (United Kingdom) on 2019-08-29 23:31 [#02584422]
Points: 4115 Status: Addict



Everyone is FAR more connected, but i reckon the 'random'
links between groups are far less, somehow LAZY_TITLE


 


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