You are not logged in!

F.A.Q
Log in

Register
  
 
  
(nobody)
...and 17 guests

Last 5 registered
Oplandisks
nothingstar
N_loop
yipe
foxtrotromeo

Browse members...
  
 
Members 8025
Messages 2545780
Today 28
Topics 123818
  
 
Messageboard index
request
 

offline EpicMegatrax from Greatest Hits on 2019-03-15 00:20 [#02571586]
Points: 10423 Status: Regular



acapella version of black eyed peas album "elephunk"


 

offline EpicMegatrax from Greatest Hits on 2019-03-15 00:28 [#02571588]
Points: 10423 Status: Regular



found found one on the tubes. but that's one of the
tracks i'm least excited to hear like this

then i find the raw vocal stems and you can see where i'm going
with this. you need bass, some light beatboxing

same fing but it would sound even better than shut up a
capella


 

offline EpicMegatrax from Greatest Hits on 2019-03-15 00:29 [#02571589]
Points: 10423 Status: Regular



finally, paydirt. recording is shit though


 

offline EpicMegatrax from Greatest Hits on 2019-03-15 00:30 [#02571590]
Points: 10423 Status: Regular



it's more or less what i wanted but the bassline is not
nearly represented enuf


 

offline welt on 2019-03-15 00:32 [#02571591]
Points: 1893 Status: Lurker



What sort of need gets satisfied by an acapella version of
Elephunk? In which context does such a wish emerge?


 

offline EpicMegatrax from Greatest Hits on 2019-03-15 00:46 [#02571592]
Points: 10423 Status: Regular | Followup to welt: #02571591



i was actually just chatting to myself about, like, how did
i get here, anyways? i'll transcribe it.

i got a new phone a while back and for ages i was just using
my old phone as a music player, because i hadn't had time to
transfer mp3s. a couple weeks ago, i copied a whole bunch
over. just browsing my mp3s and copying stuff over until i
ran out of steam and fell asleep. i'd descended into the
"hip-hop" folder and copied a bunch of stuff, just going
through, saying... yes, yes, sure... why not... and i hadn't
listened to Elephunk in ages, but it made the cut.

i haven't actually listened to it on my phone, yet. but i've
seen it repeatedly as i scrolled by, enqueuing on the train,
and so it began to lurk in my latent memory.

tonight, it had gathered enough neuronal steam that i
spontaneously decided to put Elephunk on. i'm listening to
the vocal harmonies and i go into a daydream about doing an
a capella version of "let's get retarded" with my cow
orkers. this is not as out-of-nowhere as you might think.
one of my cow orkers will sing songs, absentmindedly, if the
song comes up in conversation. once, i sang a little bit
after she trailed off, and it really stoked the flames. she
kept going for quite a while after that

before all this i'd been reading that article on
labiodentals and making mouth noises to myself; primed the
pump.

while i'm not particularly set on starting an a capella
group at work, once i snapped out of that daydream, i said:
hey! i actually want to hear a capella covers of these
songs. properly arranged, that would be dope

bootnote: i grew up watching "where in the world is carmen
san diego" featuring rockapella

ideally, rockapella would cover this album. does rockapella
post to xltronic?


 

offline EpicMegatrax from Greatest Hits on 2019-03-15 00:51 [#02571593]
Points: 10423 Status: Regular



further context: i tried to learn bass guitar in college,
and one of the few things i learned to play was the bassline
from "let's get retarded." so, the bassline is burned into
my brain, and that probably added to the momentum that
resulted in this concept

i didn't bother with bass guitar again for another decade,
but i've gotten a bit less horrible at it after some lessons
from a roommate a bit over a year ago.


 

offline EpicMegatrax from Greatest Hits on 2019-03-15 01:08 [#02571594]
Points: 10423 Status: Regular



so, yes, i do believe i can clarify my request: i want
rockapella to cover elephunk. whoever represents rockapella
on xltronic, please step up


 

offline EpicMegatrax from Greatest Hits on 2019-03-15 01:10 [#02571595]
Points: 10423 Status: Regular



their signature


 

offline EpicMegatrax from Greatest Hits on 2019-03-15 01:32 [#02571596]
Points: 10423 Status: Regular



when i was six, i loved this song.

one of the first other CDs i had, year or two later, was
Dulaman by Clannad. That was also when i discovered
The Beatles.

a lot of my musical psyche is rooted in vocal harmony.


 

offline EpicMegatrax from Greatest Hits on 2019-03-15 01:37 [#02571597]
Points: 10423 Status: Regular



when i was, oh, about eight... the flute solo in the opening
track of Dulaman spoke words to me... ~workin' my way back
to youuu, babe~


 

offline EpicMegatrax from Greatest Hits on 2019-03-15 01:41 [#02571598]
Points: 10423 Status: Regular



the implied lyrics to the second track are more like "words
can hurt"


 

offline EpicMegatrax from Greatest Hits on 2019-03-15 01:44 [#02571599]
Points: 10423 Status: Regular



meanwhile -- "two sisters" needs no explanation.


 

offline EpicMegatrax from Greatest Hits on 2019-03-15 01:54 [#02571601]
Points: 10423 Status: Regular



the galtee hunt ~ hot be soup, hot pea soup cold, hot pea
soup when it's a month old

then the harmonies kick in.


 

offline EpicMegatrax from Greatest Hits on 2019-03-15 01:54 [#02571602]
Points: 10423 Status: Regular



*pea instead of be


 

offline EpicMegatrax from Greatest Hits on 2019-03-15 02:00 [#02571603]
Points: 10423 Status: Regular



if you don't appreciate this breakdown, please kindly step
aside from electronic music


 

offline EpicMegatrax from Greatest Hits on 2019-03-15 02:32 [#02571604]
Points: 10423 Status: Regular



@welt i hope that answers ur qstation.


 

offline welt on 2019-03-15 07:41 [#02571608]
Points: 1893 Status: Lurker | Followup to EpicMegatrax: #02571604



Yes, thanks, it answers my question to a large extent.

However, at least some questions remain.

Why would a musical psyche be "rooted in vocal harmony"?
It's surely not just a random accident. A psyche might as
well be drawn to harmonic drum-patterns or to disharmonic
patterns. .. It's probably not just random that Renaissance
composers composed polyphonic harmonious vocal-music and
that 20th century composers created 12-tone atonal piano
pieces. .. Is it random that Persian classical music has
quarter-tones? Probably not, it probably answers some need.
Which need is it?



 

offline mermaidman from the indian ocean on 2019-03-15 08:09 [#02571609]
Points: 4473 Status: Regular



i like to listen to pussyfart dolls instead


 

offline Tony Danza from Bright Moon on 2019-03-15 11:28 [#02571610]
Points: 971 Status: Regular | Followup to welt: #02571608



An annoyingly long and relevant copypasta from David Byrne's
book How Music Works:

Percussive music carries well outdoors, where people might
be both dancing and milling about. The extremely intricate
and layered rhythms that are typical of this music don’t
get sonically mashed together as they would in, say, a
school gymnasium. Who would invent, play, or persevere with
such rhythms if they sounded terrible? No one. Not for a
minute. This music doesn’t need amplification,
either—though that did come along later.

The North American musicologist Alan Lomax argued in his
book Folk Song Style and Culture that the structure of this
music and others of its type—essentially leaderless
ensembles—emanates from and mirrors egalitarian societies,
but suffice it to say that’s a whole other level of
context. I love his theory that music and dance styles are
metaphors for the social and sexual mores of the societies
they emerge from, but that’s not the story I aim to focus
on in this book.

Some say that the instruments being played in the photo at
the top of the next page were all derived from easily
available local materials, and therefore it was convenience
(with a sly implication of unsophistication) that determined
the nature of the music. This assessment implies that these
instruments and this music were the best this culture could
do given the circumstances. But I would argue that the
instruments were carefully fashioned, selected, tailored,
and played to best suit the physical, acoustic, and social
situation. The music perfectly fits the place where it is
heard, sonically and structurally. It is absolutely ideally
suited for this situation—the music, a living thing,
evolved to fit the available niche.



 

offline Tony Danza from Bright Moon on 2019-03-15 11:31 [#02571611]
Points: 971 Status: Regular



That same music would turn into sonic mush in a cathedral.
Western music in the Middle Ages was performed in these
stone-walled gothic cathedrals, and in architecturally
similar monasteries and cloisters. The reverberation time in
those spaces is very long—more than four seconds in most
cases—so a note sung a few seconds ago hangs in the air
and becomes part of the present sonic landscape. A
composition with shifting musical keys would inevitably
invite dissonance as notes overlapped and clashed—a real
sonic pileup. So what evolved, what sounds best in this kind
of space, is modal in structure—often using very long
notes. Slowly evolving melodies that eschew key changes work
beautifully and reinforce the otherworldly ambience. Not
only does this kind of music work well acoustically, it
helps establish what we have come to think of as a spiritual
aura. Africans, whose spiritual music is often rhythmically
complex, may not associate the music that originates in
these spaces with spirituality; they may simply hear it as
being blurry and indistinct. Mythologist Joseph Campbell,
however, thought that the temple and cathedral are
attractive because they spatially and acoustically recreate
the cave, where early humans first expressed their spiritual
yearnings. Or at least that’s where we think they
primarily expressed these feelings, as almost all traces of
such activities have disappeared.

It’s usually assumed that much Western medieval music was
harmonically “simple” (having few key changes) because
composers hadn’t yet evolved the use of complex harmonies.
In this context there would be no need or desire to include
complex harmonies, as they would have sounded horrible in
such spaces. Creatively they did exactly the right thing.
Presuming that there is such a thing as “progress” when
it comes to music, and that music is “better” now than
it used to be, is typical of the high self-regard of those
who live in the present. It is a myth. Creativity doesn’t
“improve.”


 

offline Tony Danza from Bright Moon on 2019-03-15 12:14 [#02571612]
Points: 971 Status: Regular



(I don't think he's entirely correct about the reasons for
eschewing modulation - it had as much to do with how earlier
tuning systems produced dissonance when modulating)

(also regarding progress, it may be true that "creativity"
doesn't improve but cultural accumulation and transmission
gives more recent creators an embarassment of riches to draw
from, which wasn't available to, say, 12th century
musicians)


 

offline EpicMegatrax from Greatest Hits on 2019-03-15 16:50 [#02571618]
Points: 10423 Status: Regular | Followup to welt: #02571608



Why would a musical psyche be "rooted in vocal harmony"?
It's surely not just a random accident. A psyche might as
well be drawn to harmonic drum patterns or to disharmonic
patterns


what i really meant was, "growing up, the first couple bands
and styles i got into were all known for vocal harmony," but
i wrote it the way i did because it was much punchier.
you've run away with it, but it's for the best, because tony
posted something that seems interesting. now i have to just
read it


 


Messageboard index